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Life expectancies for many Americans have increased to such an extent that most taxpayers who retire at age 65 expect to live for another 20 years or more. Several years ago, a number of insurance companies began to offer a new financial product, often called the longevity annuity or deferred income annuity, which requires upfront payment of a premium in exchange for a guarantee of a certain amount of fixed income starting after the purchaser reaches age 80 or 85. Despite the wisdom behind the longevity annuity, this new type of product did not sell especially well, principally for tax reasons. These roadblocks, however, have largely been removed by new regulations.


The IRS continues to ramp-up its work to fight identity theft/refund fraud and recently announced new rules allowing the use of abbreviated (truncated) personal identification numbers and employer identification numbers. Instead of showing a taxpayer's full Social Security number (SSN) or other identification number on certain forms, asterisks or Xs replace the first five digits and only the last four digits appear. The final rules, however, do impose some important limits on the use of truncated taxpayer identification numbers (known as "TTINs").


On July 22, two federal appeals courts roughly 100 miles apart reached very different conclusions about one of the most widely-used provisions of the Affordable Care Act: the Code Sec. 36B premium assistance tax credit. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit found that the IRS had overreached when it issued regulations providing that individuals who obtain health coverage through a federally-facilitated Affordable Care Act Marketplace are eligible for the tax credit. In contrast, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, sitting in Richmond, Virginia, upheld the IRS regulations as a valid exercise of the agency's authority. The contradictory decisions create a split among the Circuits, which could prompt the U.S. Supreme Court to review the IRS regulations.


Employers may be able to claim a tax credit for a portion of their expenses for providing child care to their employees. Code Sec. 45F allows a employer-provided child care credit, which is a part of the general business credit. Businesses calculate the credit using Form 8882, Credit for Employer-Provided Childcare Facilities and Service, and enter any credit amount on Form 3800, General Business Credit, which must be attached to an employer's tax return.


Taxpayers that plan to operate a business have a variety of choices. A single individual can operate as a C corporation, an S corporation, a limited liability company (LLC), or a sole proprietorship. Two or more individuals can form a partnership, a corporation (C or S), or an LLC.


As an individual or business, it is your responsibility to be aware of and to meet your tax filing/reporting deadlines. This calendar summarizes important tax reporting and filing data for individuals, businesses and other taxpayers for the month of August 2014.